How Do Geothermal Heating Systems Work?

Geothermal Systems – What Are They? The word ‘geothermal’ is often heard in conjunction with natural springs in Iceland. But the heat of the Earth is of far more utility there than just for warm-water recreation in an otherwise frosty climate; a full 70% of the nation’s entire energy needs are met by geothermal means. Did you know that this energy solution is available to you, too? It’s a highly elegant system; the Earth’s scorching inner layers house molten rock that produces a phenomenal amount of heat, churning away at thousands of degrees Fahrenheit. On top of that, the Earth absorbs almost half of all the solar-generated energy we receive from the sun. So while the air temperature can vary dramatically from day to day, the ground holds heat in a much more consistent and stable pattern. This sustains a regular, moderate temperature that can be found, and used for home energy needs, at a level just below the Earth’s surface. Bryant®, the Geothermal Leader Bryant® geothermal heating and cooling systems tap into the Earth’s surface to use this thermal energy found underground, or in a pond or well water. Geothermal heat pumps are able to maintain very high efficiencies on even the coldest...

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Geothermal Heat Pumps Offer a Greener Cooling Option

If you’re looking for an efficient way to heat and cool your home, a geothermal heat pump is an option worth considering. The basis for this technology has been around for thousands of years, and today’s geothermal technology makes it possible to keep your home comfortable year round without high energy costs. How a Geothermal Heat Pump Works If you walk into a cave and go underground, you may notice that the temperature tends to remain the same, no matter what time of year it is. Though the temperature may range from 45 to 75 degrees, it remains relatively constant. It’s this consistency that makes the geothermal systems work. To install a geothermal system, the HVAC contractor lays a network of piping in the ground at a depth of six feet or more. The pipe, which contains either water or a water/refrigerant mixture, connects to the heat pump. As the heat pump circulates the liquid through the pipes, the ground temperature adjusts the temperature of the liquid within the pipe.  As the water returns to the heat pump, the change in temperature helps heat or cool your home. Benefits of a Geothermal Heat Pump System The efficiency of a geothermal system is the main...

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